Chess Pie Tart (a less sweet version)

This Chess Pie Tart is a less sweet version of the traditional chess pie. So if you have been putting off making chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, here’s your chance to enjoy one that’s much less sugary.

This Chess Pie Tart is a less sweet version of the traditional chess pie. So if you have been putting off making chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, here’s your chance to enjoy one that’s much less sugary. | wildwildwhisk.com

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Okay, I know, what the heck is with the name of this recipe, Chess Pie Tart!? Sounds a bit like I had too much to drink last night. I struggled with what to name this recipe for a long time. It’s basically a chess pie baked in a tart pan. But it’s not quite like a chess pie, since it only has half the amount of sugar typically called for in a classic chess pie recipe.

Chess Pie Tart par-baked crust and uncooked filling. | wildwildwhisk.comChess Pie Tart fresh out of the oven. | wildwildwhisk.comWhile I was researching and testing the filling for this Cookie Bomb Pie and this S’mores Bomb Pie, I realized I just made myself a sort of chess-pie-egg-tart treat. I didn’t want to call it neither chess pie nor egg tart. And thus, this funky Chess Pie Tart was born.

Chess Pie Tart all dressed up in powder sugar | wildwildwhisk.comThings You’ll Need for This Recipe

  • A shallow pie dish or a tart pan.
  • Pie weights. You can buy ceramic pie weights at the store, but my personal favorite is dry bean. I keep 2 lbs of dry bean in a large jar just for this specific purpose. You can reuse them pretty much indefinitely.
  • Fresh whipped cream for serving, optional but highly recommended.

This Chess Pie Tart is a less sweet version of the traditional chess pie. So if you have been putting off making chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, here’s your chance to enjoy one that’s much less sugary. | wildwildwhisk.comRecipe Tips and Tricks

  • Always par-bake pie/tart crust with a custard type filling to prevent a soggy bottom crust.
  • When par-baking, use a large enough piece of parchment paper to hold the bean so that there is enough to cover the edge of the crust lightly. This still allows the edge to brown but is enough to get it from getting burned. 
  • When baking with the filling, make sure to completely cover the edge with foil to keep it from burning. Remove foil to allow the edge to brown some more toward the end.
  • Always place pie dish or tart pan on a large baking sheet to allow easy transfer into and out of the oven.
  • The custard will inflate in the oven while it is baking and it is normal for it to deflate while cooling.

This Chess Pie Tart is a less sweet version of the traditional chess pie. So if you have been putting off making chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, here’s your chance to enjoy one that’s much less sugary. | wildwildwhisk.comI have always steered clear of chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, but this recipe converted me. I foresee myself making other versions of this Chess Pie Tart in the near future. So if you’re like me and looking for a less sugary chess pie, this is the one!

More Ooey Gooey Custard Type Pies!

Chess Pie Tart Recipe

Chess Pie Tart (a less sweet version)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
For the crust:
  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 ounce unsalted butter - cold
  • 3 tablespoon cold water
  • Extra flour for rolling
For the filling:
  • 4 ounce unsalted butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
Instructions
  1. Start by leaving all ingredients to be used for the filling out on the counter to come to room temperature.
  2. To prepare the crust, put flour, sugar and salt in a small bowl and mix thoroughly with a whisk. Then transfer to a food processor fitted with the dough blade.
  3. Cube the cold butter and add to the flour mixture. Pulse several times until butter is about pea size and mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  4. Drizzle cold water over the dough mixture, and pulse until the dough starts to pull together. Be mindful not to overmix, you still want chunks of butter in the dough to create a flaky crust.
  5. Turn the dough out on the counter or cutting board and shape into a disk. Wrap in plastic and rest in the refrigerator for an hour.
  6. Take pie dough out of the fridge and roll into a circle about 2” larger than your pan. Use extra flour to keep dough from sticking to the counter and roller.
  7. Carefully place the dough over the tart pan, lightly press the dough into the bottom and side of the tart pan, let the excess dough hang over the side.
  8. Press the rolling pin along the edge of the pan to take off the excess dough.
  9. Cover the prepared dough with plastic wrap and freeze for 10 - 15 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  11. Take the frozen crust out of the freezer and poke holes with a fork on the bottom and side.
  12. Line the frozen crust with parchment paper, large enough to cover the crust completely.
  13. Add pie weights or dry bean on top of the parchment paper, enough to fill to the top.
  14. Par-bake crust for 20 minutes.
  15. Remove pie weights or bean, and bake for another 5 minutes.
  16. Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack.
  17. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F.
  18. To prepare the filling, beat soften butter with sugar and salt until completely combined.
  19. Whisk together egg, cream, and vanilla in a small bowl.
  20. Add egg mixture to butter mixture and beat to combine. Stop and scrape the side a few times to make sure all the butter is completely incorporated.
  21. Beat 1 tablespoon of flour into the custard mixture until combined.
  22. Pour the prepared custard mixture into the par-baked crust.
  23. Cover the edge of the crust with foil.
  24. Bake tart for 45 minutes.
  25. Remove foil and bake for another 5 minutes.
  26. Remove from oven and let cool complete on a wire rack.
This Chess Pie Tart is a less sweet version of the traditional chess pie. So if you have been putting off making chess pie due to the extreme sweetness, here’s your chance to enjoy one that’s much less sugary. | wildwildwhisk.com
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9 Comments

  1. mjskit
    October 14, 2017 /

    It’s been years since I had a Chess pie. My mother used to make them and yes, they were really sweet, but quite good. Thanks for taking some of the guilt away. 🙂

    • October 15, 2017 /

      Awe if it’s been that long, you must try this. I just hope it’s good enough to stand next to your mom’s pie. 🙂

  2. Jennifer
    October 8, 2017 /

    I love that you used half of the sugar. I always find chess pie too sweet!

  3. October 8, 2017 /

    That looks heavenly! Beautiful and not too sweet. Perfection.

  4. cheddarben
    October 8, 2017 /

    ooo, this looks like a delicate and tasty little treat!

  5. October 8, 2017 /

    Yum, I love the sound of this. Isn’t it amazing how often you can simply reduce the amount of sugar in a recipe and still have an incredible result? I mean, I have a major sweet tooth, so I don’t have any problem adding sugar when the time is right, but if you can have something delicious that’s a little bit healthier, why wouldn’t you!? 🙂

  6. October 8, 2017 /

    This cheese pie tart looks so delicious, really gorgeous dessert to serve on a any occasion.

  7. Ken and Mai
    October 7, 2017 /

    It looks so delicious…it’s taste just jumps off the computer screen.

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