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Almond Scones

Tender Almond Scones filled with almond paste pair perfectly with a morning coffee or an afternoon tea. These scones are soft and fluffy, with a simple yet complex flavor that is absolutely irresistible.

Almond scones on a serving plate

These Almond Scones have been a family favorite since the first time I made them. They start with a base of delicious buttermilk scones, stuffed full of chopped almond paste. The scones are soft and fluffy, with a simple yet complex flavor of almond extract.

The recipe calls for premade almond paste for simplicity, but making homemade almond paste is really easy and takes just 5 minutes. If you are obsessed with almond paste like we are, you need to try these recipes too:

  • Apple Tart with Almond Paste Filling – the almond paste is spread on top of the pie crust, then sliced apples are layered over it, a mixture of cinnamon sugar gives it a finishing touch.
  • Rugelach with Almond Filling – not traditional for sure, but an amazing twist to a typical rugelach recipe.
  • Almond Croissant French Toast Bake – if you have leftover almond paste, this recipe is perfect for it since it doesn’t use up the whole batch.

How to make Almond Scones

Almond scone ingredients and substitution notes

The ingredients below do not represent the full list of ingredients for this almond scone recipe, refer to the actual recipe card for the full list. But I will be addressing some common questions and specific questions that readers have asked.

Almond scones on a serving plate

Flour

All purpose flour is called for in this recipe. You can substitute:

  • White whole wheat flour
  • Regular whole wheat flour
  • Half all-purpose + half whole wheat, I’ve made these scones with half all-purpose + half white whole wheat before.
  • If you’re planning to substitute almond flour, I will note that almond flour is gluten free and will not result in the same texture. I don’t recommend it but if you must, use half regular flour and half almond flour.

➤ All-purpose flour is my preferred choice and will yield more tender scones, so substitute at your own risk.

Leavening agents

Both baking powder and baking soda are used in this recipe. Baking soda will react with the buttermilk in the recipe, if you plan to replace buttermilk with regular milk, cream or plant based milk, you can omit the baking soda.

➤ Learn more about baking soda vs. baking powder.

Unsalted butter

I always bake with unsalted butter so I can control the amount of salt added to the recipe. You can use salted butter if that’s all you have. In this case, reduce or omit the salt called for in the recipe.

Buttermilk

You can replace buttermilk with homemade buttermilk, cream, regular milk, plant based milk, whatever you have in your fridge at the time. But if you’re not using an acidic liquid like buttermilk or homemade buttermilk, you will need to omit the baking soda.

➤ Read more about buttermilk and how to make homemade buttermilk.

Almond extract

If you don’t have almond extract, just increase the amount of vanilla extract in the recipe. But if you want the full amazing flavor of almond, you shouldn’t replace or omit almond extract.

Almond paste

The only good substitute for almond paste is marzipan, but marzipan is much sweeter so you may want to reduce the sugar in the recipe to ¼ cup or less depending on your taste and whether you will serve the scones with jam or something sweet.

Making the scone dough

Almond scones dry ingredients and added butter cubes

Making almond scone dough (Photos 1 – 2)

  1. Mix together dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add cold cubed butter, toss to cover the butter in flour. Cut the butter into the flour using a pastry blender, or simply use the tip of your fingers to press the butter. If using your fingers, work as quickly as you can so you don’t melt the butter, just until the butter is about pea and bean size.
Adding wet ingredients to make almond scone batter

Making almond scone dough (Photos 3 – 4)

  1. In a measuring cup, add an egg and enough buttermilk to fill it to the 1 cup mark. Add vanilla and almond extracts and beat to combine. Pour the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients, reserving 2 tablespoons or more to use as egg wash.
  2. Fold until a shaggy dough forms.

Shaping the almond scones

Adding almond paste filling to almond scone dough

Shaping the almond scone dough (Photo 5 – 7)

  1. Roll out the dough into a sheet. Spread the chopped almond paste over the dough as evenly as you can.
  2. Roll and tuck it into a log as you would a cinnamon roll.
  3. Pat the log down to about 1” – 1 ½” thick. Cut it up into 8 scones and place them on a baking sheet. Refrigerate or freeze for about 15 minutes before baking.

The method for shaping these almond scones is a little bit more involved but it ensures even distribution of the almond paste. If you don’t want to bother, you can add the chopped almond paste straight into the dry ingredients mixture after Step 2 above and skip the rolling.

Baking the scones

Unbaked and baked almond scones on a baking sheet

Baking the scones (Photo 8 – 9)

  1. Brush the reserved egg wash over the scones. Sprinkle sliced almonds and granulated sugar on top.
  2. Bake until golden brown.

Baker’s Tips

  • I like to use my insulated baking sheet for scones and biscuits because they bake at high temperature and this baking sheet keeps the bottom from getting scorched.
  • If you don’t have an insulated baking sheet, that’s okay. Use a lighter color baking sheet or just watch the bottom edges to make sure they don’t burn during the last few minutes and take them out a little earlier if necessary.
  • Refrigerating or freezing the scones before baking will help them keep their shape and rise taller instead of spread during the baking process.
  • This almond scone recipe yields 8 generous size scones, or you can make a dozen smaller scones. Bake the smaller scones at the same oven temperature but reduce the baking time to 15 minutes.

My scone dough is too sticky, what did I do wrong?

  • Did you measure the flour correctly? I’ve given the exact gram measurement I used in the recipe card. Using a kitchen scale will give you more accurate measurement. If you used less flour, this could result in wetter stickier scone dough.
  • Did you save some liquid to use as egg wash? If you add too much liquid, the scone dough can be wetter and stickier as well.
  • Sometimes flour just absorbs liquid differently and can cause slight variation in texture, hold back some liquid while making the dough to ensure you get the desired dough texture.
  • If you already have a very sticky dough, use extra flour while shaping and rolling it to keep it from sticking. But make sure don’t add too much flour so that the dough turns out too dry, a wetter dough will yield softer scones.
  • Using a bench scraper to scrape and lift the dough up can mitigate the stickiness while you’re shaping the scones.

Storing almond scones

Baked scones can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container or wrapped well individually for 3 – 5 days.

Can I freeze almond scones?

You can freeze baked scones for up to 6 months. Thaw completely at room temperature and reheat in the oven at 350°F for about 5 – 7 minutes for crispy scones, or simply microwave for 20 seconds.

You can also freeze the unbaked scones for up to 6 months and bake them up whenever you want fresh scones for a snack. You can bake them straight from frozen at the same oven temperature, but you’ll need to increase the baking time by 2 – 4 minutes.

Breaking open an almond scone

Love almond? Try these recipes

If you make this recipe, please let me know! Leave a comment, send me a photo, rate it and don’t forget to tag me @wildwildwhisk on Instagram. I’d love to see what’s cooking up in your kitchen. Cheers!

Almond scones on a serving plate

Almond Scones

Tender Almond Scones filled with almond paste pair perfectly with a morning coffee or an afternoon tea. These scones are soft and fluffy, with a simple yet complex flavor that is absolutely irresistible.
4.94 from 16 votes
Print Rate
Course: Bread, Breakfast
Cuisine: American, European
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 22 minutes
Total Time: 49 minutes
Servings: 8 scones
Calories: 357kcal
Author: Trang

Ingredients

  • 2 cup all-purpose flour (274 g)
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder (13 g)
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • cup granulated sugar (67 g)
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 oz unsalted butter (cold & cubed, 113 g)
  • 1 large egg
  • ⅔ - ¾ cup buttermilk (or enough to fill 1 cup including the egg)
  • ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon pure almond extract
  • 7 oz almond paste (or 1 batch of homemade almond paste)
  • 2 tablespoon sliced almond
  • Extra sugar for sprinkling
  • Extra flour for rolling

Instructions

  • Chop the almond paste into small chips, store in a bowl and set aside.
  • Sift flour, baking soda and baking powder into a large mixing bowl, add kosher salt and sugar, whisk to combine.
  • Add cold cubed butter to the flour mixture, work the butter into the flour with your fingertips or a pastry blender until all the butter pieces are about pea and lima bean size.
  • Add egg, buttermilk, vanilla extract and almond extract to a measuring cup to fill 1 cup, whisk to combine. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour in the liquid mixture, reserving 2 tablespoons to use as egg wash later. Fold with a spatula or wooden spoon until a shaggy dough forms.
  • Turn the dough out onto a well-floured board, pat the dough out to about 1/2” thick and fold it over itself. Do this a few times to create layers. Shape into a rectangle.
  • With a rolling pin, roll the dough out to about 1/4” thick and 12” - 14” long. Sprinkle the chopped almond paste evenly over the dough. Roll the dough into a log starting at the long edge. Then pat it down to about 1” - 1 ½” thick. Cut into 8 triangles.
  • Place the scones on a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate or freeze for about 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 400°F.
  • Before you put the scones into the oven, brush the top and sides with the reserved egg wash, sprinkle with some sliced almonds and a little bit of granulated sugar for shine.
  • Bake for 21-22 minutes until golden brown.
  • Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheet 5 - 10 minutes before transferring the scones to the wire rack to cool completely. Best served warm.

Video

Notes

  • Use an insulated baking sheet or a lighter color baking sheet to avoid the bottom of the scones getting burned.
  • Refrigerating or freezing the scones before baking will help them keep their shape and rise taller instead of spread during the baking process.
  • This almond scone recipe yields 8 generous size scones, or you can make a dozen smaller scones. Bake the smaller scones at the same oven temperature but reduce the baking time to 15 minutes.

Nutrition

Serving: 108g | Calories: 357kcal
Tried this recipe?Mention @WildWildWhisk or tag #WildWildWhisk!

Almond scone pin image

This post was originally published on 12/20/2014. The recipe has been updated and republished on 7/22/2020 with the latest improvements, extra tips, and a video to help you in the kitchen.

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55 Comments

  1. Cindy
    July 23, 2020 /

    5 stars
    What an amazing recipe, I’ve made these over 20 times with no issue, the neighbours love them as I share with anyone who will eat them. I have now taken this recipe and bumped it up by adding lemon juice, lemon zest and poppyseeds for a lemon poppyseed almond scone and they were a hit as well. Thank you so much for this recipe that I will be handing down to my grandchildren.

    • Trang
      Author
      July 24, 2020 /

      Thanks Cindy! And wonderful additions too. I’m so honored to hear this recipe will be handed down to your grandchildren, wow!

  2. Kenneth Orloff
    July 23, 2020 /

    5 stars
    yippee

  3. Mads
    July 18, 2020 /

    I made this today and for some reason when I tried to roll out the dough, it was so sticky it stuck to the pin even with flour, I couldn’t really shape it or do anything with it without having it go everywhere. What did I do wrong? Hope to make it again.

    • Trang
      Author
      July 19, 2020 /

      Hey Mads, did you save about 2 tablespoons of liquid to use as egg wash? Too much liquid can make it too wet, or if you measure the flour differently could throw the texture off. 1 cup of flour can range between 120 – 140 g, I added my exact gram measurement in the recipe card if you have a scale to work with. This scone dough is definitely a bit wetter and softer, so you’ll probably need to use extra flour to roll and shape it. The trick is to work with it lightly and flour often but just enough to keep it from sticking without adding too much flour cuz we don’t want the scones to come out dry. I like to use a bench scrape to lift the dough, it helps a lot when you need to get the dough off the counter and it sticks a bit. Another way you can make this is to toss all the chopped almond paste into the flour like you would blueberries or dried fruits, you may not get super even distribution but it saves you from having to roll the dough out. I hope you’ll try it again, these scones are really good!

  4. Marjorie
    July 12, 2020 /

    Hi the scones are great but a question about baking powder. It says 2 Tablespoons and in parentheses it is 13 grams. 2 T is 26 grams. Just wondering which is the correct amt

    • Trang
      Author
      July 12, 2020 /

      Hi Marjorie, the recipe says 1 tbsp not 2.

  5. Jess
    June 16, 2020 /

    5 stars
    These scones are unbelievably delicious. No butter or jam required. I didn’t have buttermilk so I added a tablespoon of vinegar to the egg then filled with milk to the 1 cup mark. I will definitely make them again.

    • Trang
      Author
      June 16, 2020 /

      Excellent! You made the perfect substitution, thanks for leaving a review, Jess.

  6. Tracey Ball
    June 6, 2020 /

    Hi Trang, I’m in the UK and would love to make these scones. Would you mind clarifying for me one or two points – All purpose flour is this UK plain flour or English? Granulated sugar – is this our caster? and 2cup, in ounces, 1/3 cup in ounces, 3/4 cup butter milk in fl ops. Thanks so much in advance. Tracey

    • Trang
      Author
      June 6, 2020 /

      Hi Tracey, all purpose is plain flour in UK, and granulated sugar is caster. I recently made this recipe again and took the measurement in grams, please look at the recipe again for the updates I just added. I hope it helps, let me know if you have any other questions.

      • Tracey Ball
        June 7, 2020 /

        Thanks Trang, that’s really good of you XX

  7. Cindy
    May 30, 2020 /

    5 stars
    Light, flaky, full of mouth watering almond flavour and easy to make, thank you so much for sharing this amazing recipe. I didn’t have buttermilk so I used heavy cream and lemon juice and let me tell you that these turned out so wonderful. I had also made instant pot clotted cream and 3 ingredient strawberry jam as I always serve scones that way but these Almond Scones didn’t need any condiments, I shared them with the neighbours and they loved them as well. Brilliant recipe

    • Trang
      Author
      May 30, 2020 /

      Thank you so much Cindy! I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe and was able to share with your neighbors 🙂

  8. Raida
    May 29, 2020 /

    4 stars
    Lovely

  9. Helia
    May 28, 2020 /

    5 stars
    Best scone recipe I have ever used!

    • Trang
      Author
      May 29, 2020 /

      Thank you Helia!

  10. Chris Rice
    May 16, 2020 /

    Could you use almond flour? In what quantity and as a whole replacement for the all purpose flour or half and half? Thanks. These sound good!

    • Trang
      Author
      May 16, 2020 /

      Hey Chris, almond flour doesn’t have any gluten and won’t give you the same texture as all-purpose flour. Ideally, I wouldn’t replace it. If you really want to, I would do half and half.

  11. Khushboo
    May 5, 2020 /

    Hello!
    Thank you so much for this amazing recipe. I just wanted to ask does salted buttet work too? If i do not put kosher salt and instead use salted butter because during quarantine it is difficult to get unsalted butter here.

    • Trang
      Author
      May 5, 2020 /

      Yes, you can use salted butter and less or no kosher salt.

  12. Kath
    April 14, 2020 /

    5 stars
    These were excellent and ridiculously addictive. I’m not great at baking, but the first time I made these all went very well. I didn’t have to fish for compliments, the fam was like, “hey, these are really good!!”

    • Trang
      Author
      April 14, 2020 /

      I’m so happy to hear everyone enjoyed these, Kath!! Thank you for visiting and making my recipe 🙂

  13. Gabriella Sacchetti
    March 22, 2020 /

    5 stars
    Excellent. So happy we tried the recipe. I doubled the recipe and baked the first 8 scones for 22 min (I think it was a bit much, at least my oven) so I baked the second batch for about 18 min and I feel they were perfect.

    The almond taste is lovely, and overall, the scones are not too sweet. I made my own almond paste (following your recipe) and found the flavour really great; first time I’ve ever made- definitely not like marzipan.

    Tip #1 for readers: be sure to chill scones in fridge at least 30 min in fridge.

    Tip #2 for readers: brush tops with egg white wash. Then toss almonds with a 1-2 tsp white sugar and very little egg white. The almonds will have a great sheen and taste. Sprinkle in too before baking

    • Trang
      Author
      March 23, 2020 /

      Thanks for all the tips, Gabriella. I’m happy to hear you enjoyed these, they’re def one of our favorites as well!

  14. Shannon
    January 8, 2020 /

    I love marzipan and I love scones. This recipe is quick and delicious. But it’s more like a biscuit than the dense, flaky scone I expected.

  15. Doreen
    December 24, 2019 /

    Can these be frozen, and reheated? I want to make as a gift ahead of time. Thanks!

    • Trang
      Author
      December 25, 2019 /

      You can freeze the unbaked dough and bake it the day before at the same oven temperature but increase the bake time by 2 mins when bake from frozen. Or freeze the baked scones and then thaw and reheat in the oven at 350F for a bout 5-10 mins before serving.

  16. Nan
    November 6, 2019 /

    I’m prepping to make them for the umpteenth time. They are always great and everyone loves them. Easy recipe to follow. Can’t wait till they are done. Thanks so much!

    • Trang
      Author
      November 6, 2019 /

      Thanks Nan! These are one of our favorites too, so happy you love them 🙂

  17. mary
    September 27, 2019 /

    5 stars
    Made these for the first time this morning. they could be an award winner!. I sent the butter and almond paste (both, but individually) through the greater in the food processor, and did all my mixing in there as well. Worked well, and was so easy! Rave reviews on these!

    • Trang
      Author
      September 29, 2019 /

      Thanks Mary for the feedback! I’m so happy you enjoyed these 🙂

  18. Jane
    May 25, 2019 /

    5 stars
    I have been dying to make these but didn’t have any almond paste on hand. Around here, we can’t just go to a store and pick some up – I’ve never found any and trust me I’ve checked! Even the baking supply store doesn’t sell it…they try to pass marzipan off as almond paste. These days I just make my own and its so easy. Just use 1 1/2 cups ground almonds, 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar, 1 egg white and 1 tsp of almond extract. Just stir until mostly combined and then knead until a ball forms. Roll into a log, wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least one hour. That will make just under 14 oz of almond paste – enough for two batches of these incredible scones! They were definitely a bit more work than your average scone but they are soo worth the effort. I may or may not have had 2 already before they had a chance to completely cool lol. Since I have half my almond paste left I can’t wait to make these again!

    • Marta
      May 1, 2020 /

      Does rolling the scone dough at the long edge mean that is opposite to lengthwise? Your recipe sounds delicious and I would like to try it out.

      • Trang
        Author
        May 2, 2020 /

        Hi Marta, please look at the process photos in the middle of the post to see how it’s rolled. You want to roll it into a long log so you can cut it into 8 portions.

  19. Sharon
    April 28, 2019 /

    5 stars
    Second time making this recipe.
    They are absolutely delicious!
    Thank you!

    • Trang
      Author
      April 29, 2019 /

      Thank you Sharon! So glad you enjoy these, one of my favorite scones too 🙂

  20. Nancy
    April 14, 2019 /

    5 stars
    I’ve made these several times and they are consistently awesome! The recipe is easy to understand and follow. I can whip them together in under twenty minutes and I am neither a pastry chef nor a kitchen whiz.
    A batch is cooling right now. Yum! And many thanks!!

    • Trang
      Author
      April 14, 2019 /

      Woohoo!!! These are one of my favorites and I’ve made them multiple times as well. Thank you so much for your feedback 🙂 I always aim to provide recipes that everyone can make and enjoy at home.

  21. Kenneth Orloff
    February 21, 2019 /

    5 stars
    sconedelicious

  22. Judy
    February 20, 2019 /

    I don’t understand Steps 5-7. Would you/Could you possibly add a video to demonstrate those steps? Your recipe sounds fantastic!

    • Trang
      Author
      February 21, 2019 /

      Hi Judy, I’m sorry but I don’t have the resources to create videos at this time. I hope that the updated process photos within the post will help enough. If and when I’m able to work full time on this blog, videos will certainly be something I need to learn. What exactly don’t you understand, could you be more specific? For example, in step 5, making well? folding to form the dough? Perhaps I could help explain further if I understand what you’re struggling with.

  23. Suzie
    November 29, 2018 /

    5 stars
    I’ve made these only twice and of all the scones I’ve baked (and eaten!) these are my favorite! Slightly more work than other recipes, but SO worth it! And SO much yum!

    • Trang
      Author
      November 29, 2018 /

      Yay!! Thanks Suzie, I’m so glad you enjoyed them 🙂

  24. Linda
    November 28, 2018 /

    5 stars
    I absolutely love marzipan, and did have to make my own as I didn’t have any. These were a little tricky to make, but you never would know once they came out. One of the best things I have ever baked! Love them!

    • Trang
      Author
      November 28, 2018 /

      I’m so glad you enjoy them. I love that you made your own marzipan too!

  25. Jaime
    August 22, 2018 /

    As a huge marzipan lover, I was so excited to try them.
    I just made them.
    Holy #%%&^% these were the best scones I’ve ever tasted!! Thank you for such an awesome recipe!

    • Trang
      Author
      August 23, 2018 /

      Hooray!! Thank you for your feed back Jaime, you made my day 🙂

  26. Kathy
    April 21, 2018 /

    5 stars
    I was at a coffee shop in Decorah, Iowa called Impact. They had the most awesome scones!! It was apple almond – I swear I tasted almond paste in there. Since the workers at the coffee shop didn’t make them, I think a company called Waving Grains did. I decided to find a recipe that at least came close. I think your recipe does but will use all purpose flour and no wheat. I will add chopped apples and a bit of cinnamon on top of the almond paste. They also used raw very coarse sugar and almonds on top.
    Your recipe should be a good one!! Thanks for sharing it!

    • Trang
      Author
      April 21, 2018 /

      Oh wow apple almond scones sound really good, I think I will have to make that now. Have you seen my Apple Pie Scones? If you mix the two recipes, I think you’ll get what you’re going after. If you love apple and almond, I think you’ll love this Apple Tart with Almond Paste Filling as well. I hope you’ll enjoy the scones!! Thanks so much for stopping by.

  27. Linda Leone
    October 10, 2017 /

    Almond paste and marzipan are two different products … marzipan has alot of sugar in it … very sweet … so which one do you use? I love the flavor of almond and would like to try this recipe … but these are expensive ingredients and want to get the right one. Thanks so much!

    • Trang
      Author
      October 10, 2017 /

      My apology for the confusion. My ingredient of choice is always almond paste because it is less sweet. I used store bought almond paste for this particular recipe, Odense brand, you can get at Target or regular grocery store. I agree with ya on the price, if you want to try making your own paste you can see the recipe in this Apple Tart post. The homemade version will be wetter, so you may not be able to slice it. You could spread it on or try freezing the paste and see if you can slice it then.

  28. Manali @ CookWithManali
    December 27, 2014 /

    This looks wonderful! I pinned this as soon as I saw the pictures! Lately I have been obsessed with scones and this recipe I must try!

    • December 28, 2014 /

      Thank Manali! Hope you had a wonderful holidays and Happy New Year (soon!) to you and your family!

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