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Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel

A Peach Cobbler with a hint of warm spice and almond essence stirs nostalgic memories of picnics in the park and block parties full of the flavors of the season. Top it off with a scoop of homemade ice cream and you have the perfect treat to wow the crowd at your next summer soirée.

Serving peach cobbler from the baking panIf you can’t decide on peach cobbler or peach crumble, why not combine them into one dish? This Peach Cobbler recipe has both a drop biscuit topping and an almond streusel topping to ensure you’re getting the best of both worlds. When it comes to dessert, the more the merrier certainly applies!

How to make Peach Cobbler

This easy peach cobbler can be made with fresh peaches, frozen peaches and even canned peaches for when you’re craving peaches in the middle of winter. Read on for tips on how to use each type of peach in this recipe.

How do you make peach cobbler with fresh peaches?

Make the almond streusel first and keep it refrigerated until you are ready to bake. The streusel can even be made well ahead of time if you wish.

Making almond streusel for peach cobbler

Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel Process Photos Step 1 – 6

  1. Add flour, almond flour, salt and sugar into a small bowl.
  2. Use a whisk to mix evenly.
  3. Cube cold butter and add it to the dry flour mixture.
  4. Use a pastry blender to cut the butter into the dry mixture until coarse crumbs form.
  5. Add sliced almonds and almond extract to the mixture.
  6. Use a fork to toss everything together to mix evenly.

Make the biscuit dough next. This can also be made ahead of time, kept covered and refrigerated until ready to use.

Making biscuit topping for peach cobbler

Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel Process Photos Step 7 – 12

  1. Add flour, sugar, salt, baking soda, and baking powder into a medium bowl.
  2. Use a whisk to mix evenly.
  3. Cube cold butter and add it to the dry flour mixture.
  4. Use the tips of your fingers to work the butter into the flour until you get pieces that are pea size or a little larger.
  5. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour in the buttermilk, vanilla extract, and almond extract.
  6. Fold with a spatula or wooden spoon until a wet dough forms.
Assembling peach cobbler for baking

Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel Process Photos Step 13 – 16

  1. Peel and dice the peaches into bite size pieces. Toss peaches with lemon juice, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and tapioca flour. Transfer peach cobbler filling to a 9” or 10” square baking pan.
  2. Using a small ice cream scoop or a tablespoon, drop spoonfuls of biscuit dough on top the peach filling evenly.
  3. Sprinkle almond streusel over the top.
  4. Bake until the top is golden brown and the filling is bubbling.

Do you have to peel peaches for peach cobbler?

No, you don’t have to peel peaches for peach cobbler. The very first time I made this peach cobbler, I left the peel on. However, over the years, I’ve baked with peaches a lot and got accustomed to peeling them for a more uniform look and taste. It’s really a personal preference but either will work.

Can I make peach cobbler with unripe peaches?

It is always best to start a recipe with the best of ingredients. In this case, ripe peaches are preferred. However, if you have unripe peaches, they can continue to ripen at room temperature within a couple of days.

If you cannot wait, I find that blanching unripe peaches in boiling water can help make them a little softer and bring out their peachiness, as well as help get the peel off them a little easier. You could also pre-cook the filling and adjust the amount of sugar to enhance the sweetness of the unripe peaches.

How do you know when a cobbler is done?

When the top of the cobbler is golden brown, the biscuit topping is cooked through – you can check this with a toothpick inserted into the bready part of the biscuit – and the filling is bubbling, your cobbler is likely done.

Why is my peach cobbler runny?

If your peaches are really juicy, it can release a lot of juices and make the cobbler filling runny. A couple of ways to combat this are:

  • Pre-cook the cobbler filling to reduce the juice before baking.
  • Add a thickening agent to the cobbler filling like tapioca flour (1 – 2 tablespoons), cornstarch (2 – 3 tablespoons) or flour (2 – 3 tablespoons).

Variations and Substitutions

  • If you don’t like almond, skip the almond streusel as well as the almond extract in the biscuit dough. Make it a simple cobbler without streusel like this Mixed Berry Cobbler.
  • Use a mix of stone fruits along with the peaches, like apricots and plums. You could even add berries that go well with peaches, like raspberries and blueberries, to the filling.
  • Reduce or increase the amount of cinnamon in the filling to your taste. You could also add other warm spices like ground ginger, cloves, allspice, nutmeg, mace, and cardamom.

Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel in a baking pan

How do you make peach cobbler with frozen peaches?

Fresh peaches at their peak are always the best option for making any peach dessert, especially peach shortcakes or peaches and cream pie. But for baked desserts, like this peach cobbler or these peach hand pies, frozen peaches will work in a pinch. The trick is to pre-cook the filling before baking.

  • Measure out the same amount of peaches called for in this recipe (about 1 lb 15 oz of frozen peach). It is best if they are cut into bite size pieces already.
  • Cook them in a saucepan with the sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, and salt until they are warm, tender and slightly jammy.
  • Transfer the cobbler filling to your baking dish, allow to cool while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  • You can skip the tapioca flour when you pre-cook the cobbler filling because some of the water has been cooked off and it won’t be super runny when baked. But you can mix the tapioca flour into the cooled filling if desired.

How do you freeze peaches for cobbler?

You can freeze your own fresh peaches to make peach cobbler after the season is over.

  • Peel and dice them into bite size pieces as you would making this cobbler from fresh peaches.
  • Spread the peaches on a parchment lined baking sheet, slightly apart so they don’t stick together.
  • Freeze the peaches on the baking sheet until frozen solid then transfer them to an airtight container or zip-top bag and continue to freeze for up to a year.

How do you make peach cobbler with canned peaches?

How many cans do I need?

You will need at least 3 ½ cans of canned peaches to get the same amount of peaches for the cobbler filling. You can use diced or sliced peaches, whichever available. If using sliced peaches, I recommend dicing them further before baking.

Do I need to add extra sugar?

Canned peaches are usually packed in a canning syrup. That syrup could be one of the following:

  • Corn syrup (heavy, light and extra light) – These already have added sugar, but depending on how sweet they are, you may or may not need to add extra sugar. Taste the peaches and decide to your taste.
  • Water with artificial sweetener – These are usually labeled as “no sugar added” but you will need to read the label carefully to find out whether there is artificial sweetener added or not. Again, with these, taste the peaches and decide for yourself.
  • Natural fruit juices – I would treat these the same way as fresh peaches, once you drain them, they will not be that sweet. So definitely add the same amount of sugar called for in this recipe.

Make sure to drain the canned peaches and discard the juice. Then follow the instructions in the recipe, taking into consideration the amount of sugar as stated above.Peach Cobbler on a plate with a scoop of ice cream

Storing and Serving Peach Cobbler

How long does peach cobbler last?

This peach cobbler will keep up to three days in the refrigerator. They won’t go bad after three days, but the flavor will start to deteriorate.

Do you refrigerate peach cobbler after baking?

It’s okay to keep the baked peach cobbler on the counter at room temperature for 1 day, especially if you’re baking it the day before to serve it the next day. Any leftovers should be refrigerated beyond that.

How do you reheat peach cobbler?

To reheat the entire tray of cobbler, I recommend using the oven. Preheat the oven to 375°F, and warm the cobbler for 10 – 15 minutes until heated through.

If you just want to reheat an individual portion, use the microwave. Spoon some cobbler on a microwave safe plate or bowl and heat for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add a scoop of mascarpone ice cream and a dollop of whipped cream on top for serving.

If you make this recipe, please let me know! Leave a comment, send me a photo, rate it and don’t forget to tag me @wildwildwhisk on Instagram. I’d love to see what’s cooking up in your kitchen. Cheers!

Baker’s Tip: You can make this peach cobbler successfully year-round using fresh, frozen, and even canned peaches. Each type of peach filling will require slightly different preparation, so be sure to read through the post or refer to the note section in the recipe.
Serving peach cobbler from the baking pan

Peach Cobbler with Almond Streusel

A Peach Cobbler with a hint of warm spice and almond essence stirs nostalgic memories of picnics in the park and block parties full of the flavors of the season. Top it off with a scoop of homemade ice cream and you have the perfect treat to wow the crowd at your next summer soirée
Print Rate
Course: Dessert, Pastries
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 9
Calories: 296kcal
Author: Trang

Ingredients

Almond Streusel

  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour 32 g
  • ¼ cup almond flour packed, 30 g
  • A pinch of kosher salt
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar 44 g
  • 2 oz unsalted butter 57 g
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • ¼ cup almond slice 25 g

Biscuit Topping

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour 130 g
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar 44 g
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 1 g
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 g
  • 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder 6 g
  • 1 ½ oz unsalted butter 43 g
  • ½ cup buttermilk 127 g
  • ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon pure almond extract

Peach Cobbler Filling

  • 4 large peaches just over 2 lbs, peeled and diced yields 873 g
  • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice 14 g
  • ¼ cup brown sugar lightly packed, 50 g
  • A big pinch of kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon 2 g
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour 8 g

Instructions

Prepare the streusel

  • Combine flour, almond flour, sugar, and salt in a small bowl, mix together thoroughly with a whisk. Cut the cold butter into small cubes and add to the dry mixture. Use a pastry blender to cut the butter into the dry mixture until coarse crumbs form.
  • Add almond extract and almond slice, use a fork to mix. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Make the biscuit dough

  • Add flour, sugar, salt, baking soda and baking powder to a medium mixing bowl and mix with a whisk to combine. Toss the cubed butter in the flour mixture and work it into the flour with the tip of your fingers until about pea size and larger.
  • Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour in buttermilk, vanilla extract and almond extract. Fold with a spatula or wooden spoon until a wet dough forms. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Prepare cobbler

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  • Peel and dice the peaches into bite size pieces. Add peaches and lemon juice to a medium mixing bowl.
  • Whisk together the brown sugar, salt, cinnamon and tapioca flour in a small bowl and sprinkle over the peaches. Toss gently with a spatula until evenly coated. Transfer peach cobbler filling to a 9” square baking pan.
  • Using a small ice cream scoop or a tablespoon, drop spoonfuls of biscuit dough on top the peach filling evenly. Then sprinkle almond streusel over the top.
  • Bake for 40 - 45 minutes until the topping is golden brown and the filling is bubbling.
  • Remove from the oven and allow to cool enough to handle before serving.

Notes

  • This cobbler can be made with fresh, frozen and canned peaches.
  • For frozen peaches, you will need to pre-cook the peach cobbler filling (without the tapioca flour) until it is warm and tender. Allow it to cool, then fold in the tapioca flour if desired.
  • You can skip the tapioca flour if pre-cooking the peach cobbler filling because this already evaporates some of the water and the filling won’t be as runny.
  • For canned peaches, you’ll need at least 3 ½ cans. Taste the peaches to decide whether extra sugar should be added to the filling.
  • Make sure to drain canned peaches and discard the juice.
  • You don’t have to peel the peaches if you don’t want to.
  • I definitely recommend using diced peaches over sliced peaches. It’s easier to serve and eat.
  • Refrigerate left over and reheat the next day either in the oven or the microwave if warm cobbler is desired.

Nutrition

Serving: 167g | Calories: 296kcal
Tried this recipe?Mention @WildWildWhisk or tag #WildWildWhisk!

This post was originally published on 7/16/2015. The recipe has been updated and republished on 8/13/2019 with the latest improvements, extra tips, and process photos to help you in the kitchen.

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3 Comments

  1. Kelly
    August 13, 2019 /

    This looks incredible! How do you think it would turn out if I used gluten free flour?

    • Trang
      Author
      August 14, 2019 /

      The only thing I would be a bit worried about is the biscuit topping texture. Depending on the type of gluten free flour you use, you may need to adjust the liquid amount for the biscuit topping since some gluten free flour can absorb more liquid. Make sure the biscuit dough comes out looking like the photo, it’s supposed to be wet and sticky. I don’t think it’s going to be soft and fluffy like regular flour, but I think it will still be pretty tasty. Come back and let me know how it turns out!

  2. August 8, 2019 /


    umm so streusel on cobbler is absolute genius. I need to make this recipe stat.

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